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Myrtle, Green Essential Oil Corsica

Myrtus communis

Can be great for asthma, expectorant, anti-spasmodic, and skin tonic

Average Rating:4 out of 5 Stars! (see reviews)

Essential Facts

Notes & Use

What Stillpoint "Nose"

I know that this Green Myrtle is a bit pricey for a myrtle oil, but it is worth every penny.   I import this green myrtle from Corsica, the same distiller that I get the Corsican Helichrysum from and it is exquisite and very very powerful.  BTW, the description below is a bit more formal in writing style and this is because i also wrote this profile for an aromatherapy journal :) 
 
Myrtle oil is used in aromatherapy mainly for its expectorant qualities, where it can be of value in asthma, bronchitis, catarrh and chronic coughs. It also has applications for skin  care, colds and flu. According to our Corsican distiller Myrtle is Anticatarrhal and an expectorant, Anti-infective, Liver Stimulant, Decongestant venous and prostate, Antispasmodic, Sedative, Skin Tonic and astringent and a Hormone balancer (thyroid, ovary).
 
Respiratory System
According to Kurt Schnaubelt, Green Myrtle is of high therapeutic value. It is most useful for all respiratory conditions, especially those involving not just the bronchial tracts but also the lungs themselves. It is extremely gentle and can be used liberally. Schnaubelt (1999) suggests that it can be used with cypress in cases of pleurisy. According to Patricia Davis this oils is well tolerated by young children because of its unobtrusive odor.  It is slightly sedative so it is great in a chest rub at night instead of Eucalyptus, which can be stimulating.
 
Skin Care
Green Myrtle is effective in skin care for the treatment of acne, oily skin and open pores. It is astringent yet gentle and anti allergenic as well as skin regenerating.  (Schnaubelt, 1998).  It is also gentle enough, so that it can be used in the treatment of Hemorrhoids. (Davis, 2005). 
 
Urinary System
Green Myrtle is very effective as an antiseptic for UTIs (urinary tract infections). According to Salvatore Batagglia, Green Myrtle is effective for bladder infections or infections of the ureter.
 
TCM perspective
Myrtus communis   (1) Clears lung heat and heat in the upper orifices Prostate decongestant, hypothyroidism   (2) Astringes leakage of qi and blood (e.g. sweating, bleeding, hemorrhoids) (Schnaubelt, 2011)
 
Other Applications
Green Myrtle is also helpful for hypothyroidism.   (Schnaubelt, 1998)
Green Myrtle has also been reported to be effective for treating head lice and their eggs (Gauthier et al, 2000)

Traditional Use of Myrtle, Green Corsica

The leaves and fruit of myrtle have had many uses in the Mediterranean and Middle East.
  • Myrtle berries were nibbled as a breath freshener in ancient Greece
  • The wood of myrtle as well as the leaves were used in cooking fires to add the food in areas of Sardinia and Italy.
  • Myrtle leaves were macerated in wine to treat infections and fevers in Ancient Egypt. It was also used to treat nervous afflictions by the Egyptians.
  • Myrtle wine was also used to treat urinary and respiratory infectio
  • The roots and bark of Myrtle were used to tan leather in Russia.
  • Women drank tea made from crushed myrtle leaves to preserve the youthfulness of their appearance and their overall vigor in France
  • It has long been viewed by traditional healers as a useful herb for diabetes in the Middle East.

Botany

Myrtus communis is native to southern Europe and North Africa.  It is a delicate and aromatic evergreen shrub or small tree that is generally 3-7 meters in height.  It has elegant, narrow oval and dark green leaves.  The flowers bloom from early summer to autumn and are white or pinkish and very fragrant. The flowers gradually turn into the fruit of the bush, blue-black berries, and provide a tasty treat for birds. (Wikepedia)
 
Green Myrtle is native to the Mediterranean region and Western Asia.  Countries that produce the essential oil of Green Myrtle are Tunisia, France, Corsica, Spain, Morocco and Italy.
Energetics

Energetic, Spiritual, and Emotional Qualities of Myrtle, Green Corsica

Myrtle is thought to have a cleansing effect on the emotional body and may be helpful to those with addictive patterns that they are working to transform.  It is also very helpful for those who have had experiences that have made it hard for them to see their own beauty.  “Myrtle is helpful for people whose body seems draped in a gray brown veil from smoking, drug abuse, or emotions like anger, greed, envy or fear.  In such cases myrtle oil helps to cleanse the person’s delicate inner being to dissolve disharmony.” 
 
According to Worwood, the spirit of Myrtle is of energetic truth and forgiveness.  It gives support to the unsupported and teaches that Divine Love embraces all living beings.
 
For the mind and spirit, myrtle is beneficial in clarifying, cleansing, aiding insight, cleansing inner being, and aiding meditation.  It is helpful to alleviate despair, fear of illness and death, self distraction, lack of composure, and materialistic learnings.

Traditional Folklore

Myrtle’s magic has been described in books and legends around the Mediterranean for centuries.  Myrtle was regarded as a holy plant by the ancient Persians.  It as a symbol of peace and love to the Jews and the Greeks felt that Myrtle was sacred. (Battaglia, 2003)
 
The Romans and the Greeks held the belief that  myrtle was revered by the goddesses of love, Aphrodite and Venus. According to legend, both Aphrodite and Venus were born from the sea and  Myrtle loves to grow in salt air. When Paris crowned Venus as the most beautiful goddess, it was myrtle that he crowned her with.   The Greeks also associated this plant with immortality. (Skinner, 2010) In magical traditions, myrtle is regarded as a protective herb.  In the myth of the nymph Daphne, she transformed herself into a myrtle tree to escape the amorous advances of Apollo.  The beautiful goddess of Myrtle is also the goddess of death and talks about life after death and the soul’s innocence and beauty. (Fischer – Rizzi, 1990)
Chemistry

Aroma-Chemistry of Myrtle, Green Corsica

The chemical composition of Green Myrtle is that of Monoterpenes, Oxides and Esters. The percentage of chemical constituents can vary quite a bit.  The following are key constiuents found in the essential oil of Green Myrtle.
 
Key constituents:
α-Pinene   18.5– 56.7% 1,8-Cineole   18.9– 37.5% Myrtenyl acetate   0.1– 21.1% (+)-Limonene   5.1– 12.7% Linalool   1.7– 9.5% α-Terpinyl acetate   0– 4.4% α-Terpineol   0– 3.3% Geranyl acetate   1.4– 2.9% Linalyl acetate   tr– 2.5% p-Cymene   0.4– 1.8% Estragole   0– 1.4%  (Tisserand and Young, 2013)
Recipes & Blends

Recipes and Blends

Recipes
Happy Skin Cream
6 drops Green Myrtle (Myrtus communis)
5 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
5 drops Carrot Seed (Daucus carota)
3 drops  Helichrysum italicum (Helichrysum italicum)
 
Blend in 1 ounce unscented lotion and apply to a clean face
 
Clarity Inhaler
7 drops Green Myrtle (Myrtus communis)
4 drops White Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi)
4 drops Fragonia (Agonis fragrans)
 
Mix essential oil in a little dish and use in a blank inhaler
 
Asthma relief diffuser blend
10 drops of Green Myrtle (Myrtus communis)
5 drops of Palo Santo (‎Bursera graveolens)
5 drops of Laurel Leaf (Laurus nobilis)
 
Blend in a small bottle to create a stock blend.
Diffuse before 5- 7 drops in a diffuser one hour before bed
Safety Etc.

Safety Information for Myrtle, Green Corsica

No known safety issues associated with this oil.  However, it may antidote homeopathic remedies.  Not to be used with babies or children under 5 years old. Can be fantastic for asthmatics, but care must be taken.

References

  • Battaglia, Salvatore. The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy. Brisbane: International Centre of Holistic Aromatherapy, 2003. Print.
  • Davis, P. Aromatherapy, an A-Z: The Most Comprehensive Guide to Aromatherapy Ever Published. London: Vermillion, 2005. Print.
  • Fischer-Rizzi, Susanne. Complete Aromatherapy Handbook: Essential Oils for Radiant Health. New York: Sterling Pub., 1990. Print.
  • Gauthier, R. "The Activity of of Extracts of Myrtus Communis against Pediculus Humanis Capitas." Aromatherapy Database. Bob Harris, n.d. Web. 8 Jan. 2014.
  • Lawless, Julia. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils: The Complete Guide to the Use of Oils in Aromatherapy and Herbalism. Shaftesbury, Dorset: Element, 1995. Print.
  • Schnaubelt, Kurt. Advanced Aromatherapy: The Science of Essential Oil Therapy. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts, 1998. Print.
  • Schnaubelt, Kurt. The Healing Intelligence of Essential Oils: The Science of Advanced Aromatherapy. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts, 2011. Print.
  • Skinner, Charles M. Myths and Legends of Flowers, Trees, Fruits, and Plants: In All Ages and in All Climes. Memphis: General, 2010. Print.
  • Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. London: Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013. Print.
  • Worwood, Valerie Ann. The Fragrant Heavens. London: Bantam, 1999. Print.

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